Tag Archives: London

Lucky SHD 100 push to 200

  • Rodinol 1+25 for 9m 30s minutes at 20ºc. Agitate for 30s then every 30s for 15s.
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+19, 20ºc, constant agitation for 1 minute
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4, 20ºc for 9 minutes
  • Wash for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol Wetting Agent 1+400 deionised water. Leave to soak for 30s rinse off any bubbles using deionised water
  • Hang dry for 2 hours
  • Scan using Plustek 8200i
  • Crop 6×4
  • Curves
  • Clean
  • Upload

This is the first time I have shot with Lucky 100 and I am very pleased with the results. I was surprised how much detail I was able to read from the negative as quite a few photographs looked washed out, as a result the contrast was fairly flat, even though pushed. The final photographs uploaded have been worked in Lightroom.

I try to retain as many aesthetic features of the film type I am shooting however on this occasion I made adjustments to achieve the best image overall as the contrast was too flat for the effect I was going for.

I used the recommended development times from DevChart. Next time I will add an extra 2-4 minutes on to the developer to see how this affects the negative on Lucky 100.

One thing I found frustrating is there are no identifiable marks on the negative. No frame numbers, film type etc. This may be me nit picking but I like having frame numbers next to my shot so I can correlate that to my digital archive. The plastic used for the negative feels flimsier than the Kentmere 400 which is hanging on the left in the photograph above. The negative also curls easily even when dried straight for two hours, I have not experienced this amount of curling once dried from any other film I have shot, ever.

I love the Lucky 100 film. It’s produced some strong black and whites with detail in the shadows and highlights, images are sharp with an un-intrusive grain. A bonus to having a low contrast negative is the massive tonal range and control in post with where I wanted contrast.

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Ilford Pan 100 pushed to 200

It has been a long time since I uploaded to this blog, my first post in over 3 years is Ilford Pan 100 pushed to 200. Developed myself. Details are below….

  • Rodinol developer 1+25 for 13 minutes at 20º. Agitate for 30 seconds then agitate every 30s for 30s
  • Ilford Stop Bath 1+19 for 1 minute at 20º Agitate for 30 seconds then agitate every 30s for 10s
  • Ilford Fixer 1+4 for 9 minutes at 20º Agitate for 30 seconds then agitate every 30s for 10s
  • Wash with cold water for 10 minutes
  • Tetanol wetting agent 1+400 (deionised water) for 1 min at 20º Agitate continuously
  • Leave to dry for 2 hours
  • Scan at 300dpi using Plustek 8200i
  • Crop in Lightroom
  • Remove dust marks in post
  • Curves
  • Upload
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Ilford XP2 Super 400

No pushing or pulling, shot straight out of the box. With a little bit of love.

Ilford XP2 Super 400 is the second film I shot at London Pride 2014. The streets were once again alive and buzzing, by this time of the day i’d had a fair bit to drink and was definitely enjoying the evening!

I have said this a lot over the past year but Ilford always performs well. This film has an excellent tonal range and really bites in the shadows whilst holding on to details. The highlights are given a glow by the grain softening them.

The 400 speed SP2 has a much larger and higher grain value compared to other 400 speed films such as Kodak TMAX or BW400CN that boast a super fine grain at high speed. That being said, the ‘rugged’, grainy look is something that I love about Ilford.

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Agfa Vista APX Plus 200

After the success of last years London Pride, I decided this year I would walk the streets in the Parade/March. Of course bringing my camera along as it’s also around the ‘anniversary’ of me starting this blog.

For most of the march I stayed alongside some of the members of my boxing club that also walked this year. Braving the rain throughout the day we started at Baker Street and finished at Whitehall.

It looks like my negative scanner is on the fritz as it’s starting to develop some lines across the images (upon closer inspection) and colour casts, nothing overly drastic, but a little frustrating and adds processing time to the photographs. Quite possibly this may also be a result of the developer used, so is something I must look into.

The Agfa Vista has quite a lot of grain for a lower iso film. Out of the box delivers average results from an average class film. Personally I don’t rate it very highly, there are other colour films out there that give much more interesting results.

That being said I haven’t pushed or pulled this film yet so I can only pass comment on the selection of images that i’ve produced and not for the entire production line of Agfa Vista.

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ADOX Color Implosion 100ISO

The 35mm Project has been lacking some colour lately! Finally after quite a bit of waiting (an error on my part) the gorgeous Adox Color Implosion shot out of the box at 100ISO during the sunnier (and warmer) spell of weather the UK had, about two weeks ago arrived today. Filling me with so much excitement and glee I could of squealed. This film has shot right up to one of my favourite films for its unique take on reality, strong grain and texture.

Color Implosion is an astonishingly high grain film at a low ISO. Resulting in some extreme saturation in parts of the images (reds) that give a punchier and crisper image. Throughout the image there is a mixture of various tones and nuances that can be seen when at a higher magnification, there is a strong presence of red across the entire film.

200%

200 Percent Magnification

The grain is not intrusive and I believe gives this film a true individuality and separation from other colour films. Where the grain most works is on the wild life photographs taken at The Wetlands Park in London. However not totally disregarding the other photographs which have their own texture from the grain.

Having gone through a standard C-41 process the trickiest part was scanning the negative into my computer. Silverfast does not have a colour profile for Adox, and I have the cheaper (box version software) that came with my scanner so I am unable to make my own profiles. Instead I used the Fuji Pro 160s profile as I felt this gave a good CCR (Colour Cast Removal) and profiled the photographs well enough for post work.

White balance set from white point. Assuming that this film should have a white balance to white. I should note there was an exceptionally strong colour cast over the photographs when scanning. As I haven’t seen what these images ‘should’ look like after being printed from an enlarger onto light sensitive paper it was difficult to tell exactly how much to remove (and whether a cast of some sort is inherant of this film type) Google searching didn’t help so I decided I didn’t feel anything was gained in the images by allowing strong colour casts, as a result I have developed my own style of images with this film.

 

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Rollei Infrared 400s pushed to 800

Over the last week i have made it my mission to get some film shot, it had been a while as i had started to use digital again for events, interiors and project work.

So the weather is improving and the summer may finally be upon us! (As i write this it’s getting darker and colder….hmmm) I have finished my dissertation and now full steam ahead into my Final Major Project. I’ve developed a project based on domestic violence with men. I had a radio interview this afternoon promoting the campaign and awareness. Please take a look at www.invisiblecampaign.com 

There was initially some problems with the developing of this film. The developer used with this film (Neotinol) isn’t listed with Rollei on Digital Truth so there was a bit of confusion with the dev times. Neotinol is similar to TMAX and DT rate it a 2ASA and 25ASA (mine is massively underexposed from those) which would relate to 12 min and 7 1/2 mins dev times respectively.

After a bit of umming and arring a clip test of 18 minutes was carried out to see the results and the images turned out fantastic, the rest of the film was then developed with an extra couple of minutes on top.

The results are great! The only thing i am getting a bit frustrated about is the lack of profiles with the negative scanner software SilverFast. I wish that it was possible to create complex customisable profiles. I am considering printing the photographs from the negatives to light sensitive paper and then scanning them on a flat bed scanner to see if the results are different. Of course scanning onto light sensitive paper will (in my opinion) always create a much better result than scanning digitally, i am more interested in how the properties of the paper will be read by the scanner rather than of the negative.

For this roll i used a mixture of Kodak BW+ 400 and Kodak TMAX and TRI-X for the profiles to use. Each profile gave varied results but i decided on the profile which gave the best range from lows to lights.

An interesting mix of highlights and shadows in this roll of film, as i didn’t use an IR filter or any special treatments the film remains relatively normal to look at. The highlights are smooth and have a soft glow to them which improves overall image quality. The shadows are deep and retain good detail, there is a fairly good contrast which is no doubt because of the push and post production work.

Whilst shooting the film i had a bit of an obsession with walls and people around them. The entire film consists of people interacting around walls however these where the images that made it to the final edit.

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Kodak 400TX (TRI-X)

The Kodak Tri-X is the first but not last roll of film that i personally developed for this project and it was a pleasure!

My early years of photography were spent in the darkroom learning to develop and print film and ‘retouch’ photographs using various techniques, unfortunately this practice was short lived as i quickly migrated to Digital because of its speed, ease and cost effectiveness.

I had always missed being in the darkroom though so decided for this project that i must start developing my own film again to fully appreciate shooting in 35mm and to please myself in the process.

I shot a roll of Tri-X and booked a brief induction to the darkroom as well as a refresher course on developing film, of course i hadn’t forgotten the process of developing however it had been almost 7 years since i developed my last roll of film so i had to make sure that i didn’t leave anything out.

I met a guy called Dave and there was 2 other people on the refresher evening, one of them i knew, Mike, who works at the Camera Club. Dave is insanely knowledgable and deeply enthusiastic about film photography, perfect! We got chatting and he guided us through the developing process, mixing solutions and the various techniques and tools available when developing film.

After this we each went into our own darkroom, shut the doors, mixed the chemicals, turned out the lights and started spooling! Fantastic! It’s like riding a bike.

Chemical process: Rodinal at 1/25 solution for 300ml 7 minute develop (12ml Rodinal topped up to 300ml water). Agitate for 30’s then tap, leave 30s, agitate twice, tap, repeat agitate every 30s.

Empty developer, rinse for about a minute then Fix with Ilford Hypam. Agitate 30s on, 30s off. All solutions at 20 degrees c. Empty and dilute with water for 15 min, didn’t use stop bath.  Note: Kodak state that you can stand tri-x with little agitation and high developer concentration, using this technique you can push the film to 3200 and beyond, this is something i will be doing in future.

I chose 7 minutes as this was the recommended time by Rodinal for Tri-X. I could also double the time for a slower develop however i wasn’t worried with that this time, in the future i will alter development times depending on the results i want from the grain. So faster develop will make the Silver Halide clump together to produce bigger grain, slower develop will have finer grain.

Film was clear after 3 mins so to permanently fix i leave for another 3 minutes. The reason for this is that film is opaque to stop light bouncing around inside the camera when you take a photo and causing the photo to expose incorrectly, fixing removes the opaque look as well as fixing the image to the film, once the film is clear during fixing make a note of that time then continue to fix again for that time duration (so 3 mins to clear, fix for another 3) this will mean that the film will stay constantly fixed and will last hundreds of years. Rather than going 20 years down the line and it becoming faded or coloured because it wasn’t fixed properly.

Once film was fixed i used some Photo Flow which helps alleviate drying marks then removed the film from the spool and hung to dry in the drying cupboard. 15 minutes later 1 perfectly developed film.

A great website for getting film development times is www.digitaltruth.com

Scanning results where fantastic, there was minimal dust and scratches on the film and the overall quality seems much better than when i have used lab’s to develop. I am tentative to speculate as to why there were minimal dust and scratches, i could of just been very lucky and the film emulsion was perfect however the past Lab results  scratches are too frequent, a part of me thinks that they’re not as careful as i would expect them to be. Suffice to say i will be developing all of my film myself from now on.

Shot on Canon EOS 620 with 24-70mm 2.8 USM L Mk II lens. I am very happy with the results of this process, the highlights have details in them and the shadows are strong, the grain desirable and consistent.

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Kodak BW400CN

This is the third post in a series of four rolls of film shot over London Pride 2013. Please take the time to look back through the previous post’s to fully appreciate the event and various film types used throughout the course of the evening.

The previous posts are Kodak Ektar 100 and AgfaPhoto APX 100

By this point in the evening i was getting quite drunk, i had great friends around me and the streets were alive with thousands of people celebrating Pride. The city had an energy surging through it. It was exciting to scan and see the results of the 400CN as i couldn’t remember some of the shots i had taken (oh dear).

This film delivers excellent deep contrasts and tones with a very desirable fine grain considering the ISO. Skin has come out clear and the highlights are giving a gorgeous glow.

I will shoot the next roll pushed as i am eager to see the results first hand as i feel it will not be able to handle a massive push due to it already being quite a contrasty look, however i could be wrong as processing will play an important factor.

Leading me on to some important news! I have signed up for Kennington Camera Club, which is only a stone’s throw away from me. I can now use the studio for larger shoots and i will also be using their darkroom to develop my own film.

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AgfaPhoto APX 100

This blog is a continuation of my previous post Kodak Ektar 100

Please take the time to read back so you fully appreciate published film. This film is the second of four film’s that i shot at London Pride 2013.

By this point the evening was starting to get quite intoxicated with the streets crawling in cans, bottles, plastic cups and people racing to the nearest Wok to Walk or Opuz. My friends and I however decided to grab an Ed’s Burger, which is one of the nicest 50’s themed diner’s around Soho.

The atmosphere around Soho was filled with happiness and people coming together which made this was one of the easiest events i have ever photographed, other than London Fashion Week, however people go out just to get their photo taken at LFW and very often need some help to ‘look alive’. It may have been because i was drinking too.

I digress, people where ecstatic to see the camera, coming together, making faces and just a little bit of tom foolery to give a warmer more playful feel to the photos i captured.

I opted to stay within a 100iso film type as the evening was very bright, this also let me save the 2 higher iso film’s i have left over for use later on in the evening.

The results from the Agfa are exceptional, the contrasts are very appealing, the grain isn’t as fine as i would of expected from 100ISO however it doesn’t hinder the quality of the image, nor is it intrusive giving even and beautiful coverage of the photos. I used my Sigma 50mm Prime throughout the entire film alternating my f/stop from 2.5 to 5.6.

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Kodak Ektar 100

Every year in London on the 29th June the streets are filled with a giant party atmosphere celebrating gay right movements and various sexualities coming together to express themselves in one of the city’s more colourful events. Pride.

This is the first time i have been to pride since 2011 as i had got bored of it, for years London pride had been neglected and was usually pouring with rain for at least a few hours, however this year it seems to have been given a complete overhaul, whether people dug deeper in their pockets or maybe it was just organised better but this years pride was, fantastic! One of the best ones i have been to in years.

It was great to see the streets filled with people enjoying themselves, the weather was perfect, not a cloud in the sky. Music was playing on every street corner from Trafalgar Square to Oxford Circus. The city was alive.

I was already a few frames in to the Ektar 100 loaded in my camera, the previous day’s weather had been terrible and i only managed to get a few frames off around Covent Garden. I was determined to get some shots over pride, i wanted to use this colour film to my full advantage. I brought 3 spare rolls of film with me and went on my merry way into central to meet some friends at one of my favourite bar’s in Soho, Ku Bar.

For this event i wanted my equipment to be as light as possible, i opted for my Sigma 50mm f/1.4 prime for the shallow aperture and it being much lighter than my 24-70. I stuck around f/2 – f/5.6 rarely going any higher.

Annoyingly retouching has taken longer with this film, there were considerable dust and scratches and also water stains on the film which i am not impressed about, the film processing seems to have not been very thorough this time and has left me with a few frames that required more work on them which could of been avoided.

The colours of this film are so saturated and fairly contrasty, Ektar was once likened by my tutor at University for sharing similar properties to Kodachrome however i feel Kodachrome had a warmer more contrasty feel to the final photographs which Ektar misses.

The grain is very desirable and fine not impeding on the quality of the photograph, i would like to see the results of Ektar pulled to 64 and then adding some contrast in photoshop how much it may resemble Kodachrome. Although as i previously stated it is not going to be identical. Dare i say it but i prefer the result of Ektar 100 over Portra 800, even though Portra is a gorgeous film type it lacks the punchiness and saturation of Ektar.

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